Really Unusual Things To Know Before Adopting A Puppy

Rescuing or adopting a dog, especially a puppy, is an exciting experience that often rivals the arrival of a newborn or human infant that comes into our lives. As a new puppy parent, often some of us don’t know exactly what to expect when we bring home a new, furry, little bundle of joy and all the responsibilities that entails that comes with those wagging cute little tails.

We all know about the additional expenses when it comes to the necessary medical attention, shots and such, proper food, toys, treats and other obvious things we comprehend before entering into this type of a long-term commitment. So instead, let’s look at some other lesser known things we need to consider and completely understand before the papers are signed.

More Specific Information

Prospective pet parents may be privy to the exact breed they’re adopting in advance, but other times the exact type of canine they’re getting may be a little bit fuzzy. Many folks don’t know that almost a quarter of dogs being adopted are actually from pure bloodlines according to the Humane Society of the USA.

Even if you’re not getting a purebred pooch of your exact choosing, you’ll still be getting a “ruff” (pardon the intended pun) idea of the breed of this new four-legged best friend you’ll be acquiring from our shelter or another rescue group.

Given this information, you will now be able to do some important and interesting research about their breed. You can find out many useful facts about them including:

  • A rich history of the origin of their breed
  • Whether they’re friendly with other dogs, cats and children
  • How adaptable, intelligent and playful they tend to be
  • Whether or not they’re known to be vocal with barking or howling tendencies
  • Their exercise needs and if they do well in smaller spaces

But don’t let the fact you live in a condo or apartment steer you away from getting a larger canine if you’ve got your heart set on a bigger dog. There are bigger breeds that do very well in smaller spaces. For example, some really “big boys” like the Great Pyrenees, Mastiffs, Newfoundlands and Saint Bernards that have been given the nickname of “mat dogs” for sleeping the majority of the day away.

It’s a dog day after all! These seemingly endless naps that our canies take usually occur while we’re away at work or school. This is a perfect scenario since we can still give them the exercise they need during our off-hours when we’re at home with them.

Fitting Lifestyles Together

Now that we’ve done our homework about what we’ll be able to expect from our precious pup, once they’ve grow into adulthood, we can carefully fiit in their needs to match our own. In other words, if we’re more athletic and want our dog to go out hiking, biking, running even swimming and enjoying other outdoor activities with us, therefore we can match their breed with us accordingly so we’re the perfect companion match.

On the other hand, perhaps an older individual or retired couple is perfectly content staying at home with a little cuddle bug. Certain kinds of lap dogs are an excellent choice to complement this opposing type of lifestyle. In both of these instances, the pups and potential owners mesh very well together given their individual needs.

Before you make this kind of life-altering decision, weigh your options carefully and make sure you understand that tiny little pup will become a huge part of your life. While they’re cute out of the gate, they can’t wait to be a part of your life for a really long time.

Tips For Relieving Your Dog’s Stress

Being a dog owner is one of the most rewarding experiences a person can have, but it does not come without its share of hard-work. Dogs can be incredible friends, and they can be a continuous source of joy and love for us humans, but they can also feel stressed out and anxious as well. As dog owners, we must be sensitive to our canine companion’s stress levels. If your dog’s behavior is slightly-off, stress could be the reason. Dogs are highly sensitive animals and get stressed in foreign situations, or if they feel uncomfortable, or in pain. You may notice a decrease in appetite when stress is the issue, a more isolated personality, your dog might act a bit more lethargic – or in some cases, even more antsy if they feel stressed. Noted below are some of the best tips for lowering your dog’s stress level.

Being There

Being with your dog is one of the greatest ways you can help them find calm, and reduce their level of stress. An article by the BBC shows that a dog’s brain reacts intensely to their owner’s presence, so keep in mind when your dog looks stressed, your being with them can greatly ease whatever discord they might feel. Dogs are biologically pack animals, so being with familiar faces really helps them find a sense of calm and relaxation.

Diet/Exercise

An anxious or stressed out dog might find comfort in a quick snack, or a bowl of good, natural food. There are many great dog-centric websites that list in-depth breakdowns of health concerns and personality traits of various breeds, even for the more obscure breeds. For example, check out this in-depth analysis of the Norwich Terrier, found by just searching the web. It is not the world’s most popular dog breed, but as this example shows, there is an exhaustive amount of information available on this breed, and we can access it faster and more efficiently than at any time in the past. The analysis linked covers everything from the basic physiology of the breed, to grooming tips, and even links exhaustively detailed descriptions of diseases that may harm the breed. The amount of information on this one lesser-known dog breed alone shows how incredibly useful the internet can be when we use it to understand our pet’s dietary/physical needs.

Petting

This goes back to the first point of the article. Your presence alone helps your dog. The BBC article went on to state that symbols of affection or approval (i.e. petting, speaking in a loving way) stimulates a dog’s brain in immense ways. So there really is a very positive neurological response from dogs when they are being shown love by their owners. And this is the key to calming an antsy dog down. Interaction. Dogs are social animals, they like to interact with life. Humans are the same. We feel bad when we have nobody to talk to, we crave affection just like our canine counterparts.

It is important to understand these above concepts if your dog seems to get stressed out a lot. Consult with your veterinarian about possible anti-anxiety medication for your dog if it becomes true issue for them. But on bigger note, be supportive of your dog, be mindful of their struggles. Their moods are largely built on your mood towards them. A little patience can go a long way!